LANGUAGE
Last updated: September 16th 2020

Other Packaging and Labeling Requirements

Warning requirements on unit packaging and labeling (e.g., packs)

Yes
Analysis

The Regulations require that warnings be printed on outer packaging for retail sale. This is interpreted as requiring warnings on unit packaging.

The law meets FCTC Art. 11 in this respect.

Warning/messages required on outside packaging and labeling (e.g., cartons)

Yes
Analysis

The Regulations require that warnings be printed on outer packaging for retail sale.

The law meets FCTC Art. 11 in this respect.

Warning texts must be in the principal language(s) of the country

Yes
Analysis

The Regulations require that the warnings be printed in Norwegian.

The law meets FCTC Art. 11 in this respect.

A requirement that warnings or messages may not be placed where they may be permanently damaged or concealed when opening the pack

Yes
Analysis

The Regulations specify that the warnings may not be destroyed upon opening the pack.

The law aligns with FCTC Art. 11 and the FCTC Art. 11 Guidelines in this respect.

A requirement that tax stamps or other required markings may not be placed where they may conceal warnings or messages

Yes
Expand to view related litigation.
Analysis

The Regulations specify that the warnings may not be concealed by tax stamps or other markings. In addition, the Tobacco Control Act prohibits the import and sale of "any cases, cartons, covers, packaging or any other product that is intended in whole or in part to conceal or obscure" health warnings.

The law aligns with FCTC Art. 11 and the FCTC Art. 11 Guidelines in this respect.

A requirement to display qualitative (descriptive) constituents and emissions messages

No
Analysis

The Regulations do not require qualitative constituent and emissions disclosures.

To align with FCTC Art. 11 and the FCTC Art. 11 Guidelines, the law should affirmatively include this requirement.

Prohibition on the display of figures for emission yields (including tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide)

Yes
Expand to view related litigation.
Analysis

The law prohibits the display of information about the amount of nicotine, tar, or carbon monoxide on product packaging. However, this provision does not appear to be currently in effect, with the effective date to be determined by the King.

The law aligns with FCTC Art. 11 and the FCTC Art. 11 Guidelines in this regard.

Plain or standardized packaging

Yes
Expand to view related litigation.
Analysis

Standardized or "plain" packaging is required for all packages of cigarettes, roll-your-own tobacco, and snus as of July 1, 2018. (There was a one-year transition period to phase out packs meeting the previous requirements, meaning that products in non-standardized packaging that were on the market prior to July 1, 2017 could continue to be sold until July 1, 2018.)

Packaging of cigarettes, roll-your-own tobacco, and snus must be in a standardized color, shape, and texture. Product packaging may not contain any elements - including text, trademark or other symbols - other than the required health warnings, brand name and variant name, quantity of cigarettes (or weight of hand rolling tobacco), and details about the producer in a standard typeface, font color, and size. Packaging may not have inserts, onserts, emit sounds or odors, or have any features designed to change the packaging after retail sale.

The law aligns with FCTC Art. 11 and the FCTC Art. 11 Guidelines with respect to plain packaging of tobacco products.

Prohibition on misleading tobacco product packaging and labeling including terms, descriptors, trademarks, or figurative or other signs (e.g., logos, colors, brand images that directly create a false impression that a tobacco product is less harmful than other tobacco products)

Yes
Expand to view related litigation.
Analysis

Because plain packaging is required, there can be no misleading elements of packaging and labeling.

In addition, the law specifically states that packaging must not give "a misleading impression of the product's characteristics, health effects, risk or emissions." However, this provision does not appear to be currently in effect, with the effective date to be determined by the King.

The law meets FCTC Art. 11 in this respect.