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Home \Legislation by Country \Honduras \  Summary
Last updated: September 22nd 2017

Introduction

Honduras became a Party to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control on May 17, 2005.

Smoke Free Places: Consumption of tobacco-derived products, which includes smoked and smokeless tobacco products and e-cigarettes, is banned in all workplaces, public places, and all public transportation (including terminals). The law contains two very limited exceptions: the law permits the consumption of tobacco-derived products in cigar factories and spaces where tobacco tasting takes place (although minors are not allowed to enter these places). There are also some restrictions on smoking in outdoor places, including in outdoor stadiums and any public or private space at fewer than two meters from where people gather or pass through.

Tobacco Advertising, Promotion and Sponsorship: All tobacco advertising and promotion by radio, television, written media, and billboards is prohibited. Bans on tobacco advertising and promotion do not extend to point of sale, retail display, or internet communications. There are some restrictions on tobacco sponsorship and the publicity of such sponsorship.

Tobacco Packaging and Labeling: Under the law, all tobacco-derived products must have graphic health warnings occupying 50 percent of both the front and back of packages. The text of each warning must occupy at least 25 percent of the total area devoted to the health warning. Warnings must be rotated and modified annually. Misleading packaging and labeling, which could include terms such as “light” and “low tar” and other signs, is prohibited

Roadmap to Tobacco Control Legislation: The Special Tobacco Control Law (LECT), enacted in June 2010 and effective February 2011, is the first comprehensive tobacco control law in Honduras. The law regulates smoking in public places, workplaces and public transport; tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship; and tobacco packaging and labeling, in addition to other policy areas. The Regulations of the Special Tobacco Control Law (RLECT) provide additional specifications in each of these policy areas. Although the original law required health warnings to occupy 80 percent of each of the principal faces of tobacco product packaging, a March 2011 amendment reduced the required size to 50 percent. The amendment went into effect in July 2011.

Review Status

This country’s legal measures were reviewed by our legal staff in consultation with in-country lawyers or tobacco control experts.

The materials and analysis available at this website are for informational and educational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice.