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Home \Legislation by Country \Sri Lanka \  Summary
Last updated: August 2nd 2015

Introduction

Sri Lanka became a Party to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control on February 27, 2005.

Smoke Free Places: Smoking is prohibited in many indoor public places and workplaces and on public transport. However, smoking is permitted in smoking areas or spaces in airports, hotels having 30 rooms or more, and restaurants having a seating capacity of a minimum of 30 persons. 

Tobacco Advertising, Promotion and Sponsorship: Many forms of tobacco advertising and promotion are prohibited, but product displays at points of sale are allowed. There are some restrictions on tobacco sponsorship and the publicity of such sponsorship.

Tobacco Packaging and Labeling: Tobacco product packages are required to have pictorial and text health warnings that cover 80 percent of the top front and back of packages and rotate every six months. Misleading packaging and labeling, including terms such as “light” and “low,” is prohibited, but it is unclear if the prohibition also includes trademarks and figurative and other signs. 

Roadmap to Tobacco Control Legislation: The National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol Act, passed in 2006, is the law governing tobacco control in Sri Lanka. The comprehensive law includes measures relating to restrictions on smoking in public places; packaging and labeling requirements; tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship; establishment of the National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol; and offenses and penalties. The Act also authorizes the Minister of Health to issue regulations under the law. The Minister issued regulations regarding the content and display of the required health warnings in August 2012 and amendments to these regulations in November 2012, February 2013, and May 2014. Because of litigation brought by the tobacco industry, these regulations did not enter into force until January 1, 2015. The National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol (Amendment) Act was passed in March 2015 and increases the size of health warnings to 80 percent of the front and back of tobacco product packages.

Review Status

This country’s legal measures were reviewed by our legal staff in consultation with in-country lawyers or tobacco control experts.

The materials and analysis available at this website are for informational and educational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice.